Mouth Guards Offer Protection and A Piece of Mind (For parents and the athlete)

LoudounWOJOSeptOct2015_Page_17In all facets of life, parents want their children to be loved, protected successful. In the realm of sports, we want our children to be successful AND free from injury. Their welfare and especially their oral health is always a high priority. Helping and learning ways to protect our children who play a sport is important to me . I am concerned about preventing injuries in general. As an orthodontist, my primary mission in the area of injury prevention is to protect the orofacial area of the body from harm. Damage to this area without proper protection and information oftentimes produces negative results and a bad outcome. OUCH!!! Problems such as: loss of teeth, breakage of teeth, fracture to the lower jaw, impairment as a result of destructive force by a blow to the lower jaw and worse a blow that could possibly be transmitted to the base of the skull is not a pleasant thought or sight. Protective mouth pieces save parents and their young athletes in many ways.

Our Jones Orthodontics Custom Mouth Guard Program is not a new invention. Custom-made mouthguards are used by professional and amateur athletes in almost every sport, all over the world. This is due to the fact that they provide the highest level of protection, retention, comfort and fit without hindering speech or breathing during athletic activity. The custom-fit mouthguard is far superior to typical boil-and-bite mouthguards in fit, retention and the wearer’s compliance. This type of mouth guard maintains its shape and protection long after other mouthguards have worn out. Custom mouthguards excel in every category, allowing for maximum athletic performance. Custom mouth guards are made by dental professionals, who can also provide expert advice on intra oral problems, along with the immediate concerns about protection against orofacial injuries.

By John H. Jones III DDS
Jones Orthodontics
20 Pidgeon Hill Dr. #206
Sterling, Va 20165
703-421-0893
Jonesforsmiles.com

Adults and Braces | Dr. John H. Jones III DDS | Jones Orthodontics

LWMMarchApril2015small_Page_15Frequently adults ask the question,” What should I expect as an adult if I get braces?”

If you think you might benefit from braces it is probably best to set up an appointment with your Orthodontist. Ask your dentist for a referral if you do not have one and of course, we at Jones Orthodontics want to be your first choice when it comes to braces in the Loudoun County.

As you know, (We) Orthodontists are specialists. We are trained to fix problems with teeth that are not aligned properly. We diagnose and assist with preventive care for treatment of dental and facial irregularities.

While I attended Dental School, We (Orthodontists) are specialists. In addition to going to Dental School, we spend 2 additional years in school focused on Orthodontics to specifically help patients with fixing problems and their teeth not properly aligned. Initially after a consultation (which is usually FREE) we take X-rays and photographs in the office. We want to study the underlying bone structure.

Depending on what we find, a treatment plan is written and recommended to the patient. As an Orthodontist with over 20 years of experience, I have
seen the industry change – much of it for the better. Today we offer our patients many options for fixing misaligned teeth. A treatment plan recommended for our patients is recommended based on what we find as the options are numerous. Mostly we want to factor in and consider making
recommendations that benefit you and your lifestyle.

Amongst the factors used to help adults determine whether braces may be an option for you include the following concerns:
– Spacing: Gaps between teeth. This can happen because teeth are missing or as a result of teeth just not filling the “gap.”
– Crooked Teeth
– Overbites: Sometimes called “buck teeth” when the upper front teeth are too far forward over the lower teeth.
– Under Bites
– OpenBite
– Cross Bites

There are many types of appliances considered in our office – both fixed and removable. Each case is different and every patient and his or her lifestyle is considered as we make recommendations for a treatment plan. Generally, the severity of the problem will determine which orthodontic
approach is likely to be the most effective.

Fixed Appliances include:
– Braces – the most common fixed appliance.
– Special Fixed Appliances.

Removable appliances include:
– Aligners.
– Removable Space Retainers.
– Removable Retainers.
– Lip and cheek Bumpers.
– Headgear.
– Jaw Repositioning Appliance (often used for patients we treat for TMJ).

By: John H. Jones III DDS
Jones Orthodontics
20 Pidgeon Hill Dr. #206 • Sterling, Va 20165
703-421-0893 • Jones4smiles.com

Food in My Braces – Oh NO! | Jones Orthodontics

LWMJanFeb2015-smallfinal_Page_17What can I eat and how do I Keep My Braces Clean?

Included in the orthodontic home care kit that we give every patient is a bilevel toothbrush, a travel toothbrush, a spiral brush, relief wax, a small mirror, floss, some floss threaders and a fluoride rinse. Along with this kit we give our patients an orthodontic diet chart that lists foods which may promote tooth decay when eaten by a person who is wearing braces. We also want to make sure that you schedule regular visits with your personal team of dental health professionals, your dentist, your dental hygienist and your orthodontist to keep your orthodontic treatment on track and to keep your hygiene at a level that keeps you from getting dental disease or tooth decay.

Dental disease (also known as tooth decay) is the destruction of tooth enamel along with the inflammation of the supporting tissues surrounding the teeth. It begins with a soft sticky film containing bacteria called plaque. This sticky film of bacteria lives in your mouth and thrives on foods such as sugars and starches. After eating, the plaque produces acids that destroy tooth enamel resulting in tooth decay. Over a longer period of time this same
bacteria causes gum disease or (periodontal disease).

After eating, the plaque becomes acidic and dissolves tooth enamel. In the early stages of tooth decay (white spot lesion) this can often be repressed with the help of fluoride toothpastes and topically applied fluoride rinses. However if enough enamel is lost, the tooth surface will break down forming a cavity otherwise known as tooth decay. Cavities can only be repaired by your dentist.

Periodontal disease is the infection of the surrounding tissues of the teeth: Periodontal disease is caused by plaque, the sticky film of bacteria that constantly forms on your teeth. This bacteria creates toxins that damage gum tissues by causing them to become inflamed and bleed. If the plaque is not removed it can harden and become calculus (tartar).

To keep your teeth and gums healthy, we recommend that our patients follow the suggestions on the diet chart and schedule a visit to their dentist once every three months for a prophylaxis (teeth cleaning). February is Dental Health Month. During this month I will be out in the community doing (free) dental exams in some of our local elementary schools.

If you or your family have not been to the dentist lately, it would be a good month to schedule an appointment.

Remember , take your child to the dentist at 3 years of age and to the orthodontist at 7 years of age.

By John H. Jones III DDS
Jones Orthodontics
703-421-0893
Jones4smiles.com

TMJ – More Than a Pain in the Jaw | Dr. John H. Jones III DDS

LWMNovDec2014small_Page_19If you have chronic headaches and the doctors say it’s all in your head—it may be in your jaw. Temporomandibular joint syndrome (TMJ) is often overlooked in current diagnoses, yet it may be the cause of your pain symptoms.

TMJ takes its name from the temporomandibular joint, which holds the lower jaw in place. When the teeth are out of alignment with each other and with the jaw joints, the result is bite disharmony, muscle spasms and a wide range of seemingly unrelated very painful symptoms.

The predisposition to TMJ can remain inactive for years until triggered by trauma to the jaw or back, poor nutrition, or even simple stress. The resulting pain, ranging from indescribable headaches along with neck and back stiffness to vertigo, tinnitus, and numbness in the extremities, sends sufferers on an often fruitless search for diagnosis and treatment. The result of this search is often depression, as sufferers become resigned to a life of pain and dependence on potent and addictive painkillers.

Temporomandibular joint dysfunction syndrome (TMJ) is the name given to a group of symptoms, some skeletal and some dentally based. Many of these same symptoms are related to muscle spasms. The muscles involved in the spasms are those which control the movement of the lower jaw. We walk on two legs instead of four, consequently these muscles also balance the head, neck and shoulders.

Your upper teeth are connected rigidly to your skull. Slightly in front of your ears, on your skull, is a bone called the temporal bone. The lower jaw, which is called the mandible, is a horseshoe shaped bone. It is the only bone in the maxillofacial complex that moves. Its free ends rise upward and end in structures called condyles. The joint between the temporal bone of the skull and the condyles of the mandible is called the temporomandibular joint. Both condyles rest on a disc that separates the head of the condyles from the temporal bone of the skull. The TMJ is the only joint in the body that both rotates (like the hinge on a door) and translates or slides smoothly (like an ice skater gliding across ice). There is a complex group of muscles and ligaments that interact with one another to open, close, balance and stabilize the mandible (lower jaw) using the right and left TMJ as the connection between the mandible and the skull.

TMJ is basically a muscle-spasm problem. Because of this, standard diagnostic tests, blood work-ups, EEGs, or X-rays yield minimum information necessary for a correct diagnosis. Often a sufferer is led to believe that little can be done for the problem except to block the pain rather than attacking the reason for it.

When there is a confirmed diagnosis of TMJ dysfunction most treatment centers around the group of muscles that move, stabilize and balance the mandible. A mandibular orthopedic repositioning appliance or M.O.R.A is designed and delivered to the patient with instructions on how to wear it. Proper M.O.R.A wear will eliminate the muscle spasms (deprogram the muscles) and correct the mandibular open and closing movements to one that is noise free, pain free, balanced and stable (reprogram the muscles).

Now that we have achieved a noise free, pain free and stable open and closing pathway for the mandible (lower jaw), we need to correct the bite.

Using orthodontic treatment we next need to properly align the teeth in the maxilla (upper arch) with the teeth in the mandible (lower arch) to bring them into harmony. Depending upon the case, we can use routine fixed orthodontic appliances (braces) or aligner therapy (Invisalign) to coordinate the upper and lower teeth in such a manner that they enhance both the now healthy TMJ’s and the now healthy muscles that open and close the lower jaw.

Successful TMJ treatment should resolve most, if not all of the symptoms associated with TMJ syndrome and on top of that leave you with a brilliant, healthy smile.

IDENTIFYING TMJ

What is TMJ? Simply put, it is a pain syndrome that leads to some or all of the following symptoms:

• Headaches • Aching or stiff neck • Aching or stiff shoulders • Backaches • Earaches, ear fullness, ringing in the ears, or pain associated with the ears • Jaw pain • Popping or clicking in the jaw joint • Facial pain • Numbness in the fingers and toes • Vertigo (dizziness) • Undiagnosable tooth pain.

By: John H. Jones III, DDS
Jones Orthodontics
20 Pidgeon Hill Dr. #206 • Sterling, Va 20165
703-421-0893 • Jones4smiles.com

Mouthguards Offer Protection and A Piece of Mind | Jones Orthodontics

LWMSeptOct2014-Final_Page_13In all facets of life, parents want their children to be loved, protected successful. In the realm of sports, we want our children to be successful AND free from injury. Their welfare and especially their oral health is always a high priority. Helping and learning ways to protect our children who play a sport is important to me . I am concerned about preventing injuries in general. As an orthodontist, my primary mission in the area of injury prevention is to protect the orofacial area of the body from harm.

Damage to this area without proper protection and information oftentimes produces negative results and a bad outcome. OUCH!!! Problems such as: loss of teeth, breakage of teeth, fracture to the lower jaw, impairment as a result of destructive force by a blow to the lower jaw and worse a blow that could possibly be transmitted to the base of the skull is not a pleasant thought or sight. Protective mouth pieces save parents and their young athletes in many ways.

Our Jones Orthodontics Custom Mouth Guard Program is not a new invention. Custom-made mouthguards are used by professional and amateur athletes in almost every sport, all over the world. This is due to the fact that they provide the highest level of protection, retention, comfort and fit without hindering speech or breathing during athletic activity. The custom-fit mouthguard is far superior to typical boil-and-bite mouthguards in fit, retention and the wearer’s compliance. This type of mouth guard maintains its shape and protection long after other mouthguards have worn out. Custom mouthguards excel in every category, allowing for maximum athletic performance. Custom mouth guards are made by dental professionals, who can also provide expert advice on intra oral problems, along with the immediate concerns about protection against orofacial injuries.

– By John H. Jones III DDS
Jones Orthodontics
20 Pidgeon Hill Dr. #206 • Sterling, Va 20165
703-421-0893 • Jonesforsmiles.com

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